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Water

Ceres brings unique capital market solutions to our water challenges. We are changing the way that businesses and utilities manage water, and the way that investors consider water risk in their investment decisions.

Faucet dripping waterWater makes life possible. It makes economies function. But, in many parts of the United States, freshwater resources are in jeopardy, creating profound long-term risks for businesses and communities.

Our water supplies are under severe strain due to growing demand, pollution and climate change. Re-thinking how we value water is a critical first step in reducing these strains and safeguarding future water supplies.

Water is a finite and precious resource, but our economic systems treat it as limitless and of little value. For many companies and other water users, their water bills are so small that it hardly seems worthwhile to conserve. The result is unsustainable water use across much of our economy—from industry to agriculture to homeowners.

Ceres brings unique capital market solutions to these challenges. We are changing the way that businesses and utilities manage water, and the way that investors consider water risk in their investment decisions. By reshaping how key economic actors value water, we can turn smart water management into a business fundamental and water stewardship into an economic imperative.

We focus on three key sectors with enormous responsibility for protecting our nation’s water security— water utilities, oil and gas, and agriculture. Taken together, these sectors are responsible for more than 90% of the nation’s water consumption. By improving their water management, we can build an economy that protects freshwater for the future.

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Reports:

Murky Waters? Corporate Reporting on Water Risk
Feb 11, 2010
February 2010 - This report is the first comprehensive assessment and ranking of water disclosure practices of 100 publicly-traded companies in eight key sectors exposed to water-related risks: beverage, chemicals, electric power, food, homebuilding, mining, oil and gas, and semiconductors. The report highlights best practices, key gaps and trends in water reporting and lays out a set of recommendations for companies and investors.
Water Scarcity & Climate Change: Growing Risks for Business & Investors
Feb 20, 2009
February 2009 - This Ceres/Pacific Institute report, done at the request of the Investor Network on Climate Risk, outlines the wide-ranging risks investors and companies face from water scarcity and how global climate change will heighten those risks in many parts of the world. The report makes clear that companies that treat pressing water risks as a key strategic challenge will be far better positioned in the future. Companies that continue to ignore these challenges put themselves at higher risk.